RESEARCH PAPER
A Study on the Visual Images of Lotus Ink-Painting
Ming Fun Yip 2  
,  
Sean Wu 3
,  
 
 
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1
Graduate Institute of Cultural & Creative Design, Tung Fang Design University, Kaohsiung, TAIWAN
2
College of Teacher Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, TAIWAN
3
Department of Digital Game and Animation Design, Tung Fang Design University, Kaohsiung, TAIWAN
4
Department of Fine Arts, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, TAIWAN
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ming Fun Yip   

College of Teacher Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan
Online publish date: 2017-10-03
Publish date: 2017-10-03
 
EURASIA J. Math., Sci Tech. Ed 2017;13(10):6697–6703
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study is to explore the visual images of lotus ink-painting of visitors and to investigate the gender, age difference. The participant who attended 2016 Hsieh, Yi-E Lotus Ink-painting exhibition. The sample consisted 199 (male: 68, female: 131; age between 18~24 undergraduate student) valid questionnaires had been collected. Results indicate that: A Lotus Ink-painting of “Zen Sit “has the most Phlegmatic (t=-17.380, p=.000), Sorrowful (t=-9.999, p=.000) Meditation (t=-18.783, p=.000), Lonely (t=-10.803, p=.000) Plain (t=-18.747, p=.000) feeling. A Lotus Ink-painting of “Red Lotus” has the most Passionate (t=30.259, p=.000), Abundant (t=24.438, p=.000), Untrammeled (t=24.235, p=.000), Liberated (t=18.187, p=.000), Foison (t=21.306, p=.000) feeling. Gender and age difference do interaction significantly influence the visual images of lotus ink-painting. An artist can adopt the visual images of lotus ink-painting concluded form this study to understand the feelings of visitors on the lotus ink-painting.
 
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