Personality and Family Context in Explaining Grit of Taiwanese High School Students
 
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1
National Academy for Educational Research
2
National Taiwan Normal University
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Chun-Yen Chang   

National Taiwan Normal University, 88 Sec. 4 Ting-Chou Rd., Science Education Center, 116 Taipei, Taiwan
Publish date: 2017-06-15
 
EURASIA J. Math., Sci Tech. Ed 2017;13(6):2197–2213
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ABSTRACT
Background:
Grit, one of the newly developed non-cognitive traits, encompasses the characteristics of perseverance and consistency of interest. Grit is associated with good academic performance, resilience, and well-being. To understand the nature of Grit in detail, this study probed the relationship between Grit and the widely-applied and well-established Big-Five personality. Family context plays a significant role in nurturing all aspects of personality traits. Accordingly, we examined two family-context variables, namely family influence and democratic parenting style, which may be predictive of Grit, particularly in an Asian context.

Material and methods:
A total of 1504 students from one private comprehensive high school participated. Multiple linear regression was conducted to determine how the various independent variables affect Grit characteristics.

Results:
The results indicate that grittier high school learners tend to display higher self-report academic performance and academic satisfaction. Multiple regression demonstrated that the four Big-Five personality traits: Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, Intellect/Imagination, are significantly predictive of Grit, with the exception of Extraversion. While family influence is predictive of Grit, democratic parenting style does not predict Grit.

Conclusions:
Based on the results, several possible explanations and suggestions are proposed.

eISSN:1305-8223
ISSN:1305-8215